Home Entertainment ‘Oldboy’ English-Language TV Series in the Works From Park Chan-wook, Lionsgate

‘Oldboy’ English-Language TV Series in the Works From Park Chan-wook, Lionsgate

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Lionsgate Television is teaming with Park Chan-wook to develop an English-language TV adaptation of Park’s iconic film “Oldboy.”

Park directed and co-wrote the original film, which was itself loosely based on the Japanese manga of the same name. He will produce the new series version along with his producing partner, Syd Lim. Executives Courtney Mock and Tara Joshi are overseeing the project for Lionsgate Television. Bryan Weiser negotiated the deal.

“Lionsgate Television shares my creative vision for bringing ‘Oldboy’ into the world of television,” said Park. “I look forward to working with a studio whose brand stands for bold, original and risk-taking storytelling.”

Originally released in 2003, “Oldboy” tells the story of a man who is kidnapped and held prisoner in a sealed hotel room for 15 years. He is suddenly released with no explanation, only to learn he has five days to discover why he was imprisoned or face the consequences. The cast included Choi Min-sik, Yoo Ji-tae, Kang Hye-jung, and Oh Dal-su.

The film received incredible praise upon its release and is widely regarded as one of the best films of the 21st century.

“Park is one of the most visionary storytellers of our generation, and we’re excited to partner with him in bringing his cinematic masterpiece to the television screen,” said Scott Herbst, executive vice president and head of scripted development for Lionsgate Television. “This series adaptation of ‘Oldboy’ will feature the raw emotional power, iconic fight scenes and visceral style that made the film a classic.”

Park is repped by WME, Industry Entertainment and Hansen, Jacobson, Teller.

Should the series go forward, it would not be the first English-language version of “Oldboy.” An American version starring Josh Brolin, Elizabeth Olsen, Sharlto Copley, Samuel L. Jackson, and Michael Imperioli was released in 2013, with Spike Lee directing.